Mountain bike pump: mini pump and CO2 pump MTB

When you are going to inflate your mountain bike tires, it is very important to pay attention to the tire pressure. Some bicycle pumps therefore have a pressure gauge. This is also known as a pressure gauge. If you’re looking for a mountain bike bicycle pump, you’ve come to the right place. I tell you everything you need to know and explain different bicycle pumps.

Why a good bicycle pump is indispensable for your MTB

If there’s one thing that matters in a mountain bike, it’s the right tire pressure. The correct MTB tire pressure depends, among other things, on your weight, the terrain you will be riding on and the weather conditions. A good bicycle pump that indicates how much bar (or PSI) your buildings have been pumped up is therefore indispensable.

In addition, you can also have to deal with a flat tire on the road. For example, due to a bump puncture (snake bite) if your tires are inflated too softly. To quickly continue your mountain bike adventure, it is nice if you have a small mini pump or a CO2 pump with you. In short, it is perhaps one of the most important mountain bike accessories!

mountain bike pump
A good mountain bike bicycle pump is essential. © MTBdex.com

Requirements of a good mountain bike bicycle pump

But, when do we speak of a mountain bike bicycle pump? Can’t I just use the bicycle pump that I also use for my city bike? In many cases not. It is important to know what the tire pressure of the MTB tires is. This way you can never inflate too soft or too hard. And by no means all bicycle pumps have a pressure gauge, where you can read the tire pressure.

In addition, not all bicycle pumps are suitable for a Presta valve. This is also called a French valve and is often the valve of MTB tires. These are just a few of the characteristics that a good bicycle pump for your mountain bike must meet. All requirements at a glance:

  • Bicycle pump is suitable for mountain bike valve (French valve/Presta valve)
  • Equipped with a pressure gauge (manometer), analog or digital display in PSI and Bar
  • Sturdy, preferably made of steel
  • With locking clip, so you can also pump MTB tires on your own
mtb valve presta
The bicycle pump must be suitable for a Presta valve (French valve). © MTBdex.com

Different types of MTB bicycle pumps

There are different types of bicycle pumps. There are of course the standing bicycle pumps. However, you can of course not take it with you and use it if you get a flat tire on the way. There are mini pumps especially for this. Let’s list all the different types of mountain bike bicycle pumps.

Standing bicycle pump

The most commonly used bicycle pumps with a mountain bike is the upright bicycle pump. This is often equipped with an easy-to-read pressure gauge, so that you can inflate the tires to the correct tire pressure. The big advantage of this type of bicycle pumps is that you need to use relatively little force. I tested an interesting bicycle pump, read my experiences in the Joe Blow Sport 3 review.

CO2 pump MTB

When you get a flat tire with your mountain bike on the way, you want to continue your ride as soon as possible. You can then use a CO2 pump for your MTB. You can easily put this MTB bicycle pump in your backpack or in the pockets of your MTB shirt. Your tire will be full again within a few seconds. A disadvantage is that you cannot see exactly what the air pressure is and that you can only use a CO2 cartridge once; it is not an environmentally friendly solution.

Another drawback is that it is hugely good for tubeless tires. CO2 is very cold, because it can be bad for the latex layer of tubeless mountain bike tires. It is therefore advisable to let the CO2 out again when you are at home, after which you can pump it up again with fresh air.

Mini pump MTB

Actually, there should be one in every MTB backpack: a mini pump! With a mini pump you can inflate the tires on the road where necessary. Perfect if you have a flat tire and want to inflate it again after repair. But not only that: if you are driving to a technical course, you can lower the tire pressure on arrival by deflating the tires slightly. Would you like to cycle back home on the asphalt afterwards? Then you can inflate the tires again!

Buy MTB bicycle pump: buying tips

When you want to buy a new bicycle pump for your mountain bike, there are a number of factors that you should pay attention to. First of all, it is very important that it is equipped with a pressure gauge that is clearly legible. In addition, it must be sturdy, suitable for an MTB valve and the pump hose must be flexible and long enough.

All important buying tips at a glance:

  • Check that the manometer (pressure gauge) is clearly legible
  • Check to how much bar the bicycle pump can pump
  • Go for a metal bicycle pump; plastic bicycle pumps do not last as long
  • Do you often only inflate the bicycle? Then choose a pump with a valve clamp
  • Double check whether the MTB bicycle pump is suitable for MTB valves

A bicycle pump may come with an adapter for a French valve (Presta valve). However, you lose it quickly, which can be annoying if you are about to leave.

mountain bike bicycle pump with pressure gauge
Is the pressure gauge easy to read? © MTBdex.com

Frequently asked questions about a bicycle pump for mountain bike

What is important in a good MTB bicycle pump?

A bicycle pump for a mountain bike must at least be equipped with a pressure gauge, so that you can read the tire pressure. In addition, he must be able to take a beating. Are you going for a bicycle pump for on the road/ Then choose an MTB mini pump.

What is the difference between a CO2 pump and an MTB mini pump?

You can easily take a CO2 pump with you and inflate your tire in no time. However, this is not an environmentally friendly choice, because you can only use the cartridges once. Also, the cold from CO2 can be bad for tubeless tires. You don’t have this problem with a mini pump, but it is a bit bigger to take with you.

Does every bicycle pump fit on an MTB valve?

A mountain bike valve is often a French valve, also known as a Presta valve. Not all bicycle pumps are suitable for this; some require you to use an adapter. Tip: always choose a bicycle pump that is compatible with mountain bike valves. You quickly lose a reducer.

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